AJA

  • Rune Iversen, Guus Kroonen

    In this article, we approach the Neolithization of southern Scandinavia from an archaeolinguistic perspective. Farming arrived in Scandinavia with the Funnel Beaker culture by the turn of the fourth millennium B.C.E. It was superseded by the Single Grave culture, which as part of the Corded Ware horizon is a likely vector for the introduction of Indo-European speech.

  • Jeffrey M. Hurwit
    Includes Open Access Supplementary Content

    The figure of Helios driving his chariot into the heavens in the south angle of the east pediment of the Parthenon is underappreciated. After brief reviews of the role of the god in myth, religion, and culture, and of his appearance in Attic vase painting, the article surveys the four (possibly five) Helioi in the Parthenon’s sculptural program.

  • Ayelet Gilboa, Yiftah Shalev, Gunnar Lehmann, Hans Mommsen, Brice Erickson, Eleni Nodarou, David Ben-Shlomo
    Available as Open Access

    Among the painted pottery types in the Levant during the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E., the “East Greek” class is especially conspicuous and usually assumed to have been produced in Ionia. This pottery is the subject of a comprehensive research project, examining it from typological, analytical, and other perspectives. Our conclusion is that the “East Greek” class comprises in fact several subgroups from various other parts of the Mediterranean.

  • Justin Leidwanger

    This article bridges two divergent traditions in the study of Graeco-Roman shipwrecks: analysis of single well-explored sites and growing databases of more cursorily documented wrecks.

  • Alex R. Knodell, Susan E. Alcock, Christopher A. Tuttle, Christian F. Cloke, Tali Erickson-Gini, Cecelia Feldman, Gary O. Rollefson, Micaela Sinibaldi, Thomas M. Urban, Clive Vella
    Available as Open Access
    Includes Open Access Supplementary Content
    Includes Open Access Supplementary Content

    In three field seasons, between 2010 and 2012, the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP) conducted a diachronic archaeological survey of the northern hinterland of Petra, Jordan. While regional reconnaissance has a long history in Jordan, it has rarely been conducted with the “intensive” methodologies today characteristic of projects elsewhere, most proximately in the Mediterranean.